EMERGENCY IN TAIJI! Call to Action! Whales IN COVE!

Below are emails sent from my dad (Scott West) within the hour! Please call your Japanese embassy! He is expecting a slaughter in the morning!!! So much for “off season”…

Far Fast Deep,

Elora Malama

EMAILS: 

11:36pm Seattle Time

I just discovered that 50-75 large cetaceans , possible pilot whales, are behind nets on the cove.  Do not know how or when they were put there.  Police are here. Photos and more information to follow.

Scott

11:58pm Seattle time 

At least 8 boats are equipped with banger poles.  Tarps set up at slaughter house.  Expect to see a slaughter in early morning.

Scott

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

31 thoughts on “EMERGENCY IN TAIJI! Call to Action! Whales IN COVE!

  1. You have to be kidding me. Don’t they have hunt periods??? Maybe they need to check their calendars. So sad.

    1. Well we are learning that this hunt is being done with a “coastal whaling permit” not a “Dolphin Hunting Permit”… there isn’t a difference to me… but that is all I know at the moment.

  2. The japanese do this because they are the most pathetic of all cultures.they take and take everything they can and have no care for what they do to the planet.their to lazy to make a nuclear power plant the RIGHT way their to lazy to dispose of uranium the RIGHT way they eat cats,dogs,rats, eat eachothers puke and take everything the planet has for granted.they are the largest pollutants.they are disgusting people..

    I hope that every single one of them dies from their radioactive problems so we can stop worrying about all the damage that tiny little island causes this planet.

    anyone that thinks this is a harsh statement needs to look deep into the entire culture of these people before judging me.
    1- they breed anything that moves for food (gross)
    2- they take advantage of not having any pollution laws and dump more toxic waste and plastics into the oceans than every other country combined
    3- they lie cheat and steal everything they can to get what they want
    4- they kill protected animals because they dont care if animals go extinct (have also single handedly put more animals into extinction than any other country)
    5- they care so much about eachother that when they have a nuclear meltdown they tell their citizens its safe even though its worse than Chernobyl
    6- i can go on all day long and have proof to back every comment i make..these people need to go.tell your government to stop bombing its oil competition and eradicate the virus destroying our world.

    1. Steve,
      I completely understand the angry place that you are coming from… the whole situation is very frustrating and sad! However, I have to say that not every Japanese person is, in your word, “disgusting”. I made many many friends while I was there and I worry about them constantly during Japan’s time of crisis…. they did not agree with the slaughter and wanted to see a change, they are trying to educate their communities.
      Please remember that the people of that island that are causing such negative environmental problems, is the governments acting through law enforcement to meet the interests of corporations destroying the planet (every country does) and then the few workers who agree to such environmental damaging jobs.

      More about the slaughter…
      There is also the problem of the country not being educated about mercury poisoning and risks of over fishing. The Japanese language doesn’t even have a word for sustainability! So it is a completely foreign concept to almost everyone there. This doesn’t make the average citizen of Japan a bad person… they are just not educated about ocean and environmental welfare, their government lies to them.

      In Japan, you listen and do whatever a authority tells you. A authority is rarely questioned. This is something that obviously needs to change, and there is a professional way to go about that… it just takes time.

      However, like you… I’m worried we are out of time….

      1. Dear Elora,

        Thanks for setting up your blog and for posting your thoughts on the issues. Your considered view is enjoyable to read when set amongst so much hatred and cultural ignorance. It is good that you recognise that corporate damage to the environment is not limited to one nation and that all industralised countries are guilty of not placing enough importance on the environment.

        Japan does more than most regarding development of green technologies and trying to promote low carbon industry. The government has promoted these with tax measures and subsidy. The Japanese are innovative thinkers in this area and should be commended for it.

        Whilst your comments on the Japanese character do have a degree of truth in them, you are painting something of a caricature. You are lucky enough to have visited Japan and seen for yourself the character of the people. However, if you do have an opportunity when you are older to live there for some time I would grasp it with both hands. Japanese culture and character is extremely complex and multi-layered. It is not as simple as being unquestioning of authority. Perhaps you should look at it this way:

        Japan is a nation that is beset my natural disasters. This has always been the case: Earthquakes, tsunami, volcano, typhoons. Historically and to this day death through sudden natural disaster has never been far away. The recent events in Tohoku illustrate this in a very tragic way. In such a society it is vital to maintain order. When natural disaster strikes in the US, public order breaks down. Not so in Japan. There has been a need for as long as people have lived in Japan to be organised and to have hierachy and cooperation. A deference to ones superiors has been crucial to maintain order as times of suffering. Japan is able to do this like no other nation. Of course, this very positive attribute has a flip side that people are reluctant at times to voice their opinion against something they disagree with. But this is not to say Japanese do not have opinions. They do but culturally it is much harder for them to express themselves. A value is placed on being reserved and avoiding confrontation. This is just one example but I could give hundreds (part of my major at Oxford University was modern Japanese history and added to 13 years of dealing with Japan everyday I have learnt a lot).

        I admire your determination to challenge the Japanese on this issue. I too would like to see an end to whaling. However, this will only ever come about through cultural engagement. The people who engage in these practices are not bad people, nor are the Japanese as a nation. Do you vilify workers in a bank because their company loans money to corporations who drill for oil in Alaska? Every organisation is tainted but to cast moral judgment is often to render one’s argument redundant.

        There is a lot more I could say but I cultural understanding and a balanced view are the best ways to achieve change. If anti-whaling groups were to make a conscious effort to contribute to disaster relief in Tohoku, perhaps this demonstration of selflessness and support would encourage the Japanese authorities to listen more on the whaling issue. Maybe, maybe not but constant vilification just breeds an intransigence that will not help achieve your goals. The reason I have dedicated 10 years to helping plan trips to Japan for my clients is a desire to play a part in increasing cultural understanding. There is a lot we can teach the Japanese but there is also a lot we can learn from the Japanese approach to many issues.

        I hope you find my comments in some way interesting and good luck with your campaign.

    2. Hello,

      I do not support whaling but consider the situation to be one that will not be resolved through this abhorrent and extreme racism. I spent three wonderful years living in Japan and have spent the last 10 years running a tour company that sends thousands of holiday makers to Japan each year. It is really sad that anyone could hold such attitudes about any other individual or nationality. However, having read through Steve’s post carefully I am assuming it is an ironic piece of political satire, mocking those who do hold such views.

      I am saddened by the actions of the whaling community. However, a little history study will tell you that the US and the UK are the chief criminals in regard of whaling. Both nations hunted whales on an enormous scale, primarily for oil. When this was no longer economically beneficial the practice was stopped. It was purely for economic reasons not out of any moral high ground. Sadly this is often the way.

      I understand the Japanese resistance to cease an activity which has thousands of years of history and played a very important part in the nation culturally. Until after WW2 the Japanese didn’t eat any meat at all. In fact, the eating of meat from mammals was prohibited by law for nearly 100 years. Whale meat was the only meat consumed and one whale was able to feed an entire village for the winter when other food was scarce. Of course, none of these things are relevant now but a little bit of cultural history and background is important when trying to understand an issue.

      Steve, just a quick note in case you are serious (which I sincerely hope you are not)

      1/ Most Japanese will not eat sheep because they find the idea repugnant! They do not eat dogs, cats or any other domestic creatures. Yes they eat things you would not but that does not make it wrong.
      2/ Pollution law in Japan is actually stricter than the US. Landmark cases in the early 1970’s saw the rise of a very strong environmental movement fighting against the discharge of poisonous waste. Food hygiene regulations are far stricter than in the UK and the US and many of the processed items that pass for ‘food’ in the US would be illegal in Japan. The Japanese have a deep connection to the natural world that has shaped the whole development of the culture. Yes, their are contradictions and hypocrisy but this is the same for everybody across the world.
      3/ I am not going to address point three.
      4/ I urge you to research things before writing such comments. The Japanese are a small island nation. Until the late 19th Century the numbers of Japanese leaving the country were practically zero as the government exercised a policy of isolation. Until the 1970’s very few Japanese travelled abroad. Unless you are claiming Japan itself was home to thousand of now extinct creatures I think you will find it impossible to back up this statement.
      5/ Regarding the situation in Fukushima and the release of radioactive materials, I suggest you make reference to the statements of the WHO, the US government (and UK and every other national government) and the world authority who regulate nuclear power have all assessed the situation and consider the measures put in place by the Japanese government to be sufficient. You may be interested to know that the recommendation not to drink the tap water in Tokyo issued by the Japanese government in mid march for two days would not have been issued in the US had radiation levels been the same. Again, Japanese regulatory levels are very strict.
      6/ Be very careful Steve. You are fortunate enough to live in a country with freedom of speech. However, incitement to racial hatred is a crime and a serious one at that.

      I can only assume that Steve’s post is as I said earlier, a poorly judged satire on those individuals who do hold such ignorant and unenlightened views. The world is a wonderful place and is populated by billions of individuals all of whom have their own views, opinions and ways of thinking. That is to be celebrated. It is just a shame that tolerance is a quality you are yet to learn.

      It is interesting to read other people’s views and I hope that I can bring just a small bit of enlightenment to this issue.

  3. My daughter and I was at the Seattle event on Saturday and it was wonderful. We would love to call the embasy however were not sure of what to say. Can you help with the wordage or possibly an email site which we can send an email to instead. Thanks for all yor do. You are a wonderful roll model for all young people.

    1. Hi Edie!

      Thank you so much for coming out to the event on the 30th!
      Well, when I call I bother them every time a new update comes in. “Hi, I’m calling to let you know the boats are hunting in Taiji Japan”… or “Are you aware they are slaughtering innocent animals as we speak?”

      I’m never rude to them, but you need to be firm…. lead the conversation and even if they don’t ask, make sure you tell them why dolphins and whales should not be hunted, captured and killed… just in a few sentences. They will take your name and number then hang up.

      Hope that helps!

  4. Just called the embassy in San Francisco (415.7877.3533) and spoke to a woman in their public relations office. She thanked me for my concern and then said that right now they’re more focused on the earthquake aftermath and cannot give Taiji priority. Then she said they wouldn’t be taking any more calls on Taiji, “at this time.” I’m still shocked. This shows how far we have to go to make this a priority.

    1. I’d love to know the radiation levels in the meat right now… they did just dump extremely large amounts of radioactive water into the ocean…. smart move!

  5. I just sent a fax to DC.
    If nothing else, they know we are watching- even though I feel so helpless…

  6. We try to inform as many people here as we can and ask them to contact the Japanese embassies and consulates and spread the word .
    Helpless angry greets from Germany 😦

  7. Thanks for what you are doing. In highschool I had a dolphin committee that raised awareness about the tuna netting issue then and also abouthow terrible marine mammal captivity is. I still write comments to papers, etc. when these issues pop up, but haven’t done much for some time…
    I am so happy to hear that others like you are out there!
    Go Elora go!!!

  8. @Alastair:
    I do get your point and agree with you as far as several of Steve’s statements are concerned.
    But as far as several of your comments on Japanese “culture” are concerned, you’ve well phrased it yourself:

    What’s going on in Taiji right this moment is not a matter of Japanese “culture” or tradition (which I highly respect and in many ways admire !). This is nothing the Japanese people would want – if they only were all informed about it and aware of it. This is nothing the majority of Japanese people would approve of. And this is certainly not about Japanese efforts towards green technologies and low carbon industry either.

    This is about the deeds of a handful of people in Taiji. There are (also financial) alternatives to these slaughters, and they have been offered to those fishermen. Nevertheless the slaughters continue. This is not an issue of “tolerance”. What’s going on there is wrong. In Japan or any other country. It’s inhumane. It’s cruel , unnecessary and in certain regards illegal.
    THAT’s the issue that needs to be “understood”. And the fact that “other” countries have done (or do) this-or-that wrong , in the past or today, doesn’t change a thing about what’s going on in Taiji – right this moment.

    I can only agree with Brian Barnes, posted by Ric O’Barry today:
    Internationally, our hearts and support (!) did -and still do- go out to the Japanese people for the terrible situation they’ve been in since the events in March. That should unconditionally go without saying.

    But just as Brian Barnes phrased it: We also want that “the leaders of Japan understand that showing compassion to dolphins, porpoises and their larger cousins, the great whales, is something the rest of the world is looking for from them. (..) It is unfortunate that 26 dolphin hunters in a small town can bring such shame to an entire nation, and most of that nation doesn’t even know this slaughter happens.”

    See today’s report from Brian Barnes: “Today I witnessed the slaughter of about 40 pilot whales”…..
    http://savejapandolphins.org/blog/post/a-new-slaughter-of-pilot-whales-in-taiji

    Especially if “culture and tradition” are the reason for such deeds (in Japan or elsewhere !) , it’s – in my opinion- our DUTY as human beings to express our hope for changes – and to protest against something that’s simply cruel, imhumane and wrong. No matter where in the world.

  9. For some reason, some lines didn’t appear above, which shredded the posting. Therefore I post it again:

    @Alastair:
    I do get your point and agree with you as far as several of Steve’s statements are concerned.
    But as far as several of your comments on Japanese “culture” are concerned, you’ve well phrased it yourself: “Of course, none of these things are relevant now .”

    What’s going on in Taiji right this moment is not a matter of Japanese “culture” or tradition (which I highly respect and in many ways admire !). This is nothing the Japanese people would want – if they only were all informed about it and aware of it. This is nothing the majority of Japanese people would approve of. And this is certainly not about Japanese efforts towards green technologies and low carbon industry either.

    This is about the deeds of a handful of people in Taiji. There are (also financial) alternatives to these slaughters, and they have been offered to those fishermen. Nevertheless the slaughters continue. This is not an issue of “tolerance”. What’s going on there is wrong. In Japan or any other country. It’s inhumane. It’s cruel , unnecessary and in certain regards illegal.
    THAT’s the issue that needs to be “understood”. And the fact that “other” countries have done (or do) this-or-that wrong , in the past or today, doesn’t change a thing about what’s going on in Taiji – right this moment.

    I can only agree with Brian Barnes, posted by Ric O’Barry today: “Right now the nation of Japan needs the compassion of the world to help them through the aftermath of the terrible events on March 11th.”
    Internationally, our hearts and support (!) did -and still do- go out to the Japanese people for the terrible situation they’ve been in since the events in March. That should unconditionally go without saying.

    But just as Brian Barnes phrased it: We also want that “the leaders of Japan understand that showing compassion to dolphins, porpoises and their larger cousins, the great whales, is something the rest of the world is looking for from them. (..) It is unfortunate that 26 dolphin hunters in a small town can bring such shame to an entire nation, and most of that nation doesn’t even know this slaughter happens.”

    See today’s report from Brian Barnes: “Today I witnessed the slaughter of about 40 pilot whales”…..
    http://savejapandolphins.org/blog/post/a-new-slaughter-of-pilot-whales-in-taiji

    Especially if “culture and tradition” are the reason for such deeds (in Japan or elsewhere !) , it’s – in my opinion- our DUTY as human beings to express our hope for changes – and to protest against something that’s simply cruel, imhumane and wrong. No matter where.

Comments are closed.